Career Development Plan Part Two

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Career Development Plan Part Two

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Career Development Plan Part Two
Development of A Training and Mentoring Program
University of Phoenix
HRM/531
Patrick J. Stluka
Week Three

Development of A Training and Mentoring Program
The new West Coast Sales Division is comprised of individuals who will excel in all aspects of InterClean??™s business. We have strong sellers, relationship builders and demonstration organizers; everyone will be trained or retrained in these areas of expertise as well as customer relations to insurance a balanced team.
The new training and mentoring needs for our team, are basic customer service needs the art of the sell and complete follow-up. With the power shift of the customer, our customer relations need to be outstanding. ???Using the Internet, customers can access databases that allow them to compare prices and examine product reviews; hence there are ongoing needs to meet the product and service needs of customers??? (Cascio, 2006, p. 287). Our team will be instructed in development of full-range service packages tailored our individual accounts. ???They??™ll be trained to engage directly with facilities managers, health care professionals, and operational executives in their customers organizations??? (University of Phoenix, 2010, p. 1). Products and services in the same industry can be identical in order to separate ourselves from our competitors we have to be innovative. Our training will help refine our processes, transform us into problem solvers, and teach our team to cultivate relationships with customers and coworkers. This will be an advantage for all team members as well as our entire organization.
The objectives of the training and mentoring program revolve around teamwork. ???As more firms move to employee involvement and teams in the workplace, team members need to learn behaviors such as asking for ideas, offering help without being asked, listening and feedback skills, and recognizing and considering the ideas of others??? (Cascio, 2006, p. 288). As with any company or team there are some members who are stronger in some areas then others. The stronger team-mates may be called upon to mentor other members and help in their growth process. The West Coast sells division needs to operate as one entity, the company culture will change and we must all bend with our new intertwined company.
Each member was chosen because they are experts in some of the methods previously discussed. The performance standards have not changed all members are expected to demonstrate an excellence that reflects brilliantly on InterClean. With training it is also expected that any weak areas be honed in and corrected to the best of the team member??™s ability.
Jim Martin, Vice President of Sales, prides himself on meeting and exceeding his sales plan each year and is not afraid to try new ideas to achieve sales. He has a reputation for taking extra steps to care for the customer. Jim may give advice in regards to creating a sales plan to works for each individual team member.
Tom Gonzalez, Sales Manager, has proven his ability to lead a team and for his expertise in developing solutions-based products for the customer. Tom understands the art of establishing long-term relationships and he enjoys being the point person for customers with problems. Tom would be an excellent choice for discussing the development of solutions-based products.
Susan Burnt, Sales Representative, Susan is ???aggressive in closing the sale and she understands the importance of providing excellent ???after the sale??? service??? (University of Phoenix, nd, Para. 6). Susan may help those who are not experts in the follow- up procedure, whole working on her ability to demonstrate what our products can do.
Eric Borden, Sales Representative, has served as team leader on several special projects and had a solid reputation for excellent customer service. His interest and knowledge of the latest industrial cleaning and sanitation industry developments and the regulations and compliance issues that affect the industry should be shared with the team.
Ving Hsu, Sales Representative, ???Ving enjoys working with customers and performs training seminars on a regular basis in order to help train the employees of his customers. Customers know that if there is a problem they cannot handle, they can contact Ving. He knows how to obtain appropriate answers through his personal network of industry professionals??? (University of Phoenix, nd, Para. 9). Ving will be an excellent asset in teaching his follow members how to perform training seminars.
Dennis White, Sales Representative, likes to hunt for new customers, convince the customer to try the product and close the deal. He is a strong sales associate and a good example of a candidate for a customer service mentor, Tom Gonzalez or Susan Burnt could offer guidance regarding cultivating long-term customer relationships.
Along with the alternative training methods mentioned above, where team members train other team members, E-learning which is simply one form of computer-based training (CBT) will also assist in our training process. ???CBT is the presentation of text, graphics, video, audio, or animation via computer for the purpose of building job-relevant knowledge and skill. Common forms of CBT include multimedia learning environments (CDs, DVDs, desktop systems), intranet- and Web-based instruction, e-learning, intelligent tutoring systems, full-scale simulations, and virtual-reality training??? (Cascio, 2006, p. 285). Through our company based intra-net we will have the ability to track the progress and the hours each team member spends in the training procedure. We will also have the ability to assign team members to assist with the training of other members. E-learning will cut the training cost, travel will not be necessary and if member needs help they can ask their follow members. Internet access is standard at work and at home for most of our team, and advances in digital technologies now ???enable training designers to create interactive, media-rich content??? (Cascio, 2006, p. 285). Finally, there is a growing selection of high-quality e-learning products and services. In addition, increasing bandwidth and delivery make e-learning particularly attractive, and it fits into our company culture perfectly. E-learning will remain in our Intra-net for all new employees, and our employees will always have a way to retrain themselves if they or a supervisor find that it is needed. However, the first training cycle for each employee will only be for one month. After the training the employees move into ???action learning, in which participants learn through experience and application, it is an excellent vehicle for facilitating positive transfer from learning to doing??? (Cascio, 2006, p. 302).
Within the training procedure it is important that all supervisors provide feedback. Feedback is essential for learning as well as for trainee motivation. The emphasis should be on when and how the trainee has done something correctly. Feedback does not always need to be positive but the most powerful rewards are likely to be those provided by the trainee??™s immediate supervisor. With some employees feedback helps them move forward while no feedback will keeps their abilities on the same unimproved level. Supervisors will also be required to talk to their employees about setting goals for themselves. ???Goal theory is founded on the premise that an individual??™s conscious goals or intentions regulate her or his behavior. Research indicates that once an individual accepts a goal, and is committed to achieving it, difficult but attainable goals result in higher levels of performance than do easy goals or even a generalized goal such as ???do your best???(Cascio , 2006, p. 298). While goal setting clearly affects trainees??™ motivation, so does the expectations of the trainer. Expectations have a way of becoming self-fulfilling prophecies, so the higher the expectations, the better the trainees perform.
The west coast sales division will begin training in three weeks; we hope to be a fully functioning team in three months.

References
Cascio, W. F. (2006). Managing human resources: Productivity, quality of work life, profits.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix.
University of Phoenix. (2010). Scenario: InterClean, Inc..
Retrieved from University of Phoenix, HRM/531 – Human Capital Management website.
Cascio, W. F. (2006). Managing human resources: Productivity, quality of work life, profits.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix.
University of Phoenix. (nd). Employee Profiles.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix, HRM/531 Human Capital Management website.
University of Phoenix. (nd). Employee Profiles.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix, HRM/531 Human Capital Management website.
Cascio, W. F. (2006). Managing human resources: Productivity, quality of work life, profits.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix.
Cascio, W. F. (2006). Managing human resources: Productivity, quality of work life, profits.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix.
Cascio, W. F. (2006). Managing human resources: Productivity, quality of work life, profits.
Retrieved from University of Phoenix.


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